Education after high school north dakota

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EDUCATION AFTER HIGH SCHOOL

UNIT

5

Lesson Descriptions

Education After High School 1: The Cost of College

How much does college cost?

Education After High School 2: Financial Aid

What are some ways to help pay for college?

Education After High School 3: Entrance Requirements

How do colleges decide which students to admit? Note: This lesson requires coordination with your school counselor.

Education After High School 4: Building Credentials

What do my high school activities tell college admissions officers/employers about me?

Education After High School 5: To Go or Not to Go?

What are some reasons for and against attending college? Why is planning for college a good idea? Note: Video rental suggested for this lesson.

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PLANNING PYRAMID

GRADE 9 (7?12), Unit 5, Education After High School

Some Students Will:

? Identify scholarships that match their interests and abilities.

Most Students Will:

? Compare the relative costs of in-state and out-of-state tuition. ? Compare the relative costs of community colleges, public four year

colleges, and private four year colleges. ? Understand the following about financial aid:

- Financial aid can be based on need or merit. - L oans have to be paid back, and can take a big bite out of

entry-level salaries. - T here are all kinds of scholarships available if you know where

to look; many are highly competitive. ? Identify grades and standardized test scores as important

admissions benchmarks. ? Identify activities that will serve as credentials for college

admissions officers and future employers.

All Students Will:

? Understand that income increases with education. ? Understand that school costs vary widely. ? Understand that it's possible to find an affordable option for post-secondary

education. ? Identify one way in which one's high school performance influences colleges or

future employers. ? Identify at least one reason to consider college, and at least one reason to

consider another post-secondary option.

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Roads to Success

is a new program designed to help middle and high school students prepare for their futures. This newsletter will keep you posted on what we're doing in school, and how families can follow through at home.

To find out more, visit

Did you know?

Some colleges and tech schools have few or no requirements to get in. But not all of their students make it to graduation! Students should figure out their chances of success before they enroll.

Ask:

? What remedial courses will I be required to take if I'm not ready for college work?

? What percentage of students graduate?

Grade 9 Family Newsletter

Education After High School

The College Question

Why go to college? Better pay and more job opportunities top most kids' lists. There are also advantages that can't be measured -- meeting new people, living on your own, learning more about the world.

There are colleges to match every personality and background -- from small schools where students get lots of attention to large schools with big-city flavor. And there are other options -- community colleges, trade schools, and training programs -- to help students get ready for the world of work.

Things your student should consider:

Why am I going? What career am I planning for? How does college fit into my plans?

Am I prepared to do the work? College courses build on what you learned in high school. If you don't have As and Bs now, you should know what to do to improve. You'll also need to know how to study without prodding from your parents or teachers.

What other choices should I consider? Am I interested in a career that doesn't require college? What trade schools or apprenticeships can help me get the job I want?

What steps do I need to take next? Talk to people who have the careers you're interested in. Research to find out what education is required.

Plan on taking tests required for college admission (the PSAT in grade 10, the SAT or ACT in grade 11).

Visit colleges and apply to your top choices in the fall of your senior year.

Grade by Grade: Financial Aid

The news is full of stories about the rising costs of higher education, but there are still ways to make college affordable.

Some community colleges cost less than $3,000 a year. And some very expensive colleges offer generous financial help to make it possible for students from all backgrounds to attend. Here are a few ways to help pay for school.

Scholarships: Some schools and organizations give students money for achievement -- like sports ability or good grades. Other scholarships are awarded based on a family's financial need. Scholarships don't need to be repaid.

Grants: Grants are based on financial need and don't need to be repaid.

Work/study & Internships: Students get

paid for working, often in the subjects they're studying.

Loans: Students can borrow money at a low interest rate, which must be paid back (a certain amount each month) once they've left school.

For more information, visit or your local library or school guidance office.

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The Cost of College

#1 EDUCATION AFTER HIGH SCHOOL

The BIG Idea The BIG Idea

? How much does college cost?

AGENDA

MATERIALS

Approx. 45 minutes I. Warm Up: A Leg Up

(10 minutes) II. : The College

Variety Pack (10 minutes) III. Fees Please! (20 minutes) IV. Wrap Up: Cost Crunch?

(5 minutes)

OBJECTIVES

STUDENT HANDBOOK PAGES:

? Student Handbook page 56, Education & Earnings

? Student Handbook pages 57-59, Fees Please!

? Student Handbook pages 60-61, Education After High School Glossary

FACILITATOR PAGES:

? Facilitator Resource 1, DO NOW

? Facilitator Resource 2, Directions for (optional)

? Facilitator Resource 3, Vocabulary Review: Definitions

? Facilitator Resource 4, Vocabulary Review: Key Words

During this lesson, the student(s) will:

? Learn about the financial benefits of going to college.

? Learn that there are a wide variety of post-secondary school options available at a range of costs.

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Grade #9 ,(7U-n1i2t )N, aEdmueca#t:ioLnesAsoftnerTHitilgeh School 1: The Cost of College

OVERVIEW ............................................................................................

In this lesson, students brainstorm reasons to go and not to go to college. They look at and discuss a chart of average earnings based on education. In groups, they use to investigate the costs of four different types of schools: tech/trade, community college, four-year public college or university, and four-year private college or university. Lastly, they review the results of their research as a class.

PREPARATION .....................................................................................

List the day's BIG IDEA and activities on the board. Write the day's vocabulary words and definitions on the board. The following handouts need to be made into overhead transparencies or copied onto chart

paper: ? Student Handbook page 56, Education & Earnings ? Student Handbook pages 57-59, Fees Please! ? Facilitator Resource 3, Vocabulary Review: Definitions You will need to copy the following handouts: a. Facilitator Resource 4, Vocabulary Review: Key Words. (Each pair of students will

need one set of the nine vocabulary words. Cut the words out and place them in either an envelope or a plastic bag.) b. Facilitator Resource 2, Directions for (This resource is optional. If your students are proficient using , you may choose not to use this handout.) Make arrangements for the class to use the computer lab, and make sure the website is accessible from students' computers. If computer access is a problem at your school, make 30 school packets containing the information listed below. You should include a mixture of tech/trade schools, community colleges, four year public schools, and four year private schools. You may choose to make one packet containing the information below for 30 different schools or you may choose to make multiple copies of the most popular schools. [Note: These packets include information needed for future lessons in this unit.]

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