Georgia department of human services quick facts

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GEORGIA DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES QUICK FACTS

Robyn A. Crittenden, Commissioner

TABLE OF CONTENTS

I. DHS Mission, Vision and Core Values II. Division of Family and Children Services

Child Protective Services Foster Care and Adoptions Family Independence III. Division of Child Support Services Community Outreach: Parental Accountability Court Program Community Outreach: Fatherhood Program IV. Division of Aging Services Home and Community-Based Services Adult Protective Services V. Office of Inspector General Benefits Recovery Unit Residential Child Care Licensing VI. DHS Contacts: Quick Reference

GEORGIA DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

MISSION

Strengthen Georgia by providing individuals and families access to services that promote self-sufficiency, independence, and protect Georgia's vulnerable children and adults.

VISION

Stronger Families for a Stronger Georgia.

CORE VALUES

? Provide access to resources that offer support and empower Georgians and their families. ? Deliver services professionally and treat all clients with dignity and respect. ? Manage business operations effectively and efficiently by aligning resources across the

agency. ? Promote accountability, transparency and quality in all services we deliver and programs

we administer. ? Develop our employees at all levels of the agency.

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GEORGIA DIVISION OF FAMILY & CHILDREN SERVICES

Child Protective Services

Strengthening Georgia by protecting its most vulnerable children from the risk of abuse and neglect.

Reporting

DFCS receives reports of abuse and neglect through a centralized line (1-855-GACHILD) that operates 24 hours per day, seven days per week.

Report of abuse/neglect

Not accepted or assigned (screen out or screen out & refer to outside resource)

Accepted & assigned for investigation

Accepted & assigned for Family Support Services

Substantiated Unsubstantiated Assessment of family functioning

is completed. No maltreatment finding is made.

? Opened for Family Preservation Services ? Opened for Foster Care or Case Closure

Safety threats are identified. Case sent

to investigations

Case Closure or Opened for Family Preservation Services (if safety threats are identified)

? No safety threats identified

? Services needed

? Services not needed ? Services provided

or in progress

Increased Community Awareness & Impact on DFCS Caseloads

Since the implementation of a centralized reporting system for child welfare concerns in April 2014, reports of abuse and neglect have risen tremendously in Georgia. To help manage an increased demand for DFCS services, Gov. Nathan Deal has committed funding to reduce case managers' caseloads to 15 per worker -- a nationwide best practice -- by 2017.

AVERAGE CASELOAD FOR CASE MANAGERS IN 2015 BY REGION*

Region 1 18.33

Region 2 17.85

Region 15 17.95

Region 3 20.74

Region 5 19.60

Region 14 13.50

Region 4 20.11

Region 13 14.92

Region 7 16.56

Region 6 14.95

Region 9 32.06

Region 12 18.63

Region 8 21.87

Region 11 22.73

Region 10 17.07

*Averages calculated for case managers carrying caseloads of five or more.

To report abuse or neglect call 1-855-GACHILD (1-855-422-4453)

Bobby Cagle, Director Virginia Pryor, Deputy Director, Child Welfare

Jon Anderson, Deputy Director, Family Independence Carol Christopher, Deputy Director, System Reform

4,099

Investigations were opened as a result of abuse or neglect referrals in October 2015.

3,574

Family Support cases were opened as a result of abuse or neglect referrals in October 2015.

4,529

Investigations were opened as a result of abuse and neglect referrals in October 2014.

3,567

Family Support cases were opened as a result of abuse and neglect referrals in October 2014.

Revised 1/2016

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GEORGIA DIVISION OF FAMILY & CHILDREN SERVICES

Foster Care & Adoptions

Reasons for Entry

Top 5 reasons children entered DFCS custody (SFY2015):

NEGLECT

4,525

DRUG ABUSE

2,892

INADEQUATE HOUSING

1,906

ABANDONMENT

1,011

INCARCERATION

1,004

Greatest Need for Foster Homes

By county. Darkest red = greatest need.

Those interested in foster parenting can call 1-877210-KIDS or visit dfcs.dhs. generalinformation for answers to frequently asked questions concerning foster parenting, links to related sites and upcoming events for the foster care and adoption communities.

From inquiry to approval, the process can take from five to 10 months due to safety screenings, pre-service training, required documentation and home evaluations.

After calling the 1-877-210-KIDS inquiry line, prospective parents are assigned to a resource development case manager from the local DFCS office to begin the process.

Bobby Cagle, Director Virginia Pryor, Deputy Director, Child Welfare Jon Anderson, Deputy Director, Family Independence Carol Christopher, Deputy Directory, System Reform

11,551

approximate number of children in DFCS custody as of 9/30/15.

SFY2015 Adoptions

843 children transitioned from state custody into adoptive families in 2015.

FINALIZED ADOPTIONS BY COUNTY

Atkinson

1 Evans

1 Muscogee 3

Baldwin

5 Fannin

9 Newton

4

Banks

6 Fayette

3 Paulding

8

Barrow

13 Floyd

32 Peach

3

Bartow

37 Forsyth

9 Pickens 10

Berrien

5 Franklin

1 Pierce

1

Bibb

39 Fulton

50 Pike

6

Brantley

1 Gilmer

10 Polk

4

Brooks

9 Glynn

28 Putnam

2

Bulloch

13 Gordon

8 Rabun

4

Butts

4 Grady

3 Randolph 3

Camden 10 Greene

3 Richmond 19

Candler

2 Gwinnett 13 Rockdale 6

Carroll

12 Habersham 5 Schley

1

Catoosa

6 Hall

23 Spalding 12

Chatham 16 Haralson

5 Stephens 6

Chattooga 7 Hart

2 Sumter

3

Cherokee 26 Henry

3 Taylor

1

Clarke

12 Houston

3 Terrell

4

Clayton

15 Jackson

8 Thomas

3

Cobb

42 Jasper

1 Tift

9

Coffee

4 Jeff Davis 1 Toombs

2

Colquitt

11 Jefferson

1 Towns

3

Cook

5 Jones

5 Troup

3

Coweta

8 Lamar

6 Turner

1

Crawford 7 Lanier

2 Union

1

Crisp

1 Liberty

1 Upson

10

Dade

3 Lowndes 10 Walker

4

Decatur

1 Macon

4 Walton

12

DeKalb

33 Madison

9 Ware

1

Dodge

2 Meriwether 3 Washington 1

Douglas

6 Monroe

11 White

5

Effingham 13 Morgan

2 Whitfield 24

Elbert

3 Murray

11

Revised 1/2016

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GEORGIA DIVISION OF FAMILY & CHILDREN SERVICES

Family Independence

Strengthening Georgia by providing individuals and families access to services that promote self-sufficiency and independence.

Nutritional Assistance

SNAP The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), also known as the food stamp program, provides low-income Georgians help with their monthly food costs.

$2.8 billion

Amount food stamps added to Georgia's economy in SFY2015.

Gross income must be

Average size of household receiving food stamps.

of the federal poverty level to qualify for benefits.

850,628

Households receive food stamps in Georgia.

Medicaid

SNAP Works

Using a $15 million grant, Georgia is testing a program in select counties to provide intensive job training and placement services to SNAP recipients who are between the ages of 18 and 49, able to work and do not have a dependent child in their home. Working much like a managed care provider for medical services,

the program seeks to help recipients become self sufficient through coordination with multiple state agencies, including the Technical College System of Georgia, the Department of Labor and the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities.

Currently, Georgia provides employment and training services to SNAP recipients in 12 counties. Over the next three years, the Division plans to serve 2,500 Georgians using grant funds.

718,457

applications submitted for Medicaid in SFY2015.

Medicaid provides health coverage to low-income families, pregnant women and adults who are determined to be aged, blind or disabled. DFCS is a contractor of the Department of Community Health, providing eligibility determinations to applicants of the program. Apply for or renew benefits online at pass.

Childcare and Parent Services

DFCS continues to provide eligibility determinations for applicants of the Childcare and Parent Services (CAPS) program operated by the Department of Early Care and Learning. Georgia residents can apply for CAPS at pass..

For information on economic assistance or to report fraud, call 1-877-423-4746.

Bobby Cagle, Director Virginia Pryor, Deputy Director, Child Welfare Jon Anderson, Deputy Director, Family Independence Carol Christopher, Deputy Director, System Reform

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families

The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program was created in 1996 as part of welfare reform legislation. The program provides time-limited cash assistance to Georgia's neediest families. During SFY2015, Georgia had a total of 17,777 families who received TANF; 14,995 were child-only cases, including foster children in the care of relatives and 2,782 were adult recipients. Adults must participate in a work program, unless there are special circumstances. The average benefit amount is $159.69 per month.

Revised 1/2016

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