Investigation of the baker hotel mineral wells texas

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The word "investigation" is defined as "a searching inquiry for ascertaining facts; detailed or careful examination."

The key word here is "facts". Do ghosts exist? No, it has not been proven. Therefore are no facts to investigate.

What we do have is the testimony of the witnesses and this is where an investigational process will work. Investigations are often viewed as a skeptical activity because the main goal is trying to determine what the witness actually saw. Is it explainable or not? This is done through critical thinking and an event replication process developed by SGHA. This is an important concept because what defines a haunting or ghost sighting is "Multiple witnesses reporting unusual phenomena over a period of time". If these phenomena can be explained, the witness reports are no longer validating paranormal activity as a cause and thus there is no ghost or haunting. Additionally historical research may be done in an attempt to validate facts.

It is important to understand that the goal of an investigation is not to find evidence of the paranormal but to attempt to identify any natural or manmade causes of the reported phenomena

Definition of Terms

Investigation Status: Unsolved investigations will have either an open or closed status. An investigation is given an "Open" status if:

The investigators were unable to replicate all of the witness events. Something significant remains that is still unsolved.

It is important to understand that an "open" investigation does not mean that the unsolved facts are paranormal in nature. It simply means that we have exhausted our resources and cannot solve the "open" items/events.

A "Closed" status indicates that there is insufficient data or confounding variables that prevents replication or identifying possible explanations. This often occurs when investigators do not have direct access to witnesses or some

other environmental change have occurred that creates confounding variables.

Confidentiality Notice

Many of the witnesses interviewed have wished to remain anonymous in exchange for presenting their accounts of paranormal experiences. We honor that request and thus witnesses will often be identified by aliases. Any coincidence between aliases and actual persons is unintentional.

Contents

Part 1: Location Information....................................................... 4 Part 2: Location History .............................................................. 4 Part 3: Witnesses ........................................................................ 9 Part 4: Reported Phenomenon.................................................10 Part 5: Historical Investigations and myth building ............... 12 Part 6: Investigation.................................................................15 Part 7: Conclusion.....................................................................17 Part 8: Photographs .................................................................. 18

Part 1: Location Information

The Baker Hotel

Mineral Wells, Texas

Part 2: Location History

The Baker Hotel was always at cross purposes with time.

It opened at a point when time seemed to stand still, just before it jerked backwards. T.B. Baker threw open the doors of his 14 story, 450 room pleasure palace two weeks after Black Friday, the stock market crash in October, 1929.

But then, for the next 40 years or so, the hotel was ahead of its time. The Baker Hotel was glamorous, indeed. Baker, a hotel entrepreneur, designed

it in the Spanish Renaissance style after the Arlington Hotel in Hot Springs, Ark., another Southern city, like Mineral Wells, renowned for the curative abilities of its water. It was only the second hotel in the United States to have its own swimming pool.

Now, even in disrepair, the regal digs evoke wonder. Even cloaked in suffocating heat during a recent visit, standing in the wasted lobby it was easy to imagine Will Rogers shuffling up to the check-in desk, Gen. John J. Pershing marching down the stairs, or Marlene Dietrich sashaying in the grand entrance. They were just a few of the rich and famous who came here to "the South's greatest health resort."

The whole second floor of the air-conditioned hotel - that was still a novelty in 1929 - was reserved as the bath-and-massage floor. Private elevators allowed guests to discreetly go to and from treatments in robe and slippers. And "patients" came from all over the United States, as doctors everywhere

prescribed week long stays in health resorts, in those days before pharmacology caught up to demand.

By the late 1940s, modern medicines had replaced mineral water as cures for ailments such as rheumatism and eczema. The magic of the waters of Mineral Wells had faded. Not that the Baker Hotel was left high and dry. In the 1950s, the hotel turned to business conventions and non medicinal vacation packages for its main business. The Baker Hotel advertised its baths to "overworked, stressed out executives," according to the Mineral Wells Chamber of Commerce, which notes that some 80 percent of the hotel's business came from Dallas and Fort Worth businessmen and their families escaping the city. In the early days of the Dallas Cowboys, when the games were blacked out in Dallas, people rented rooms at the Baker to watch the games on a television station out of Wichita Falls, the chamber notes.

The hotel stayed busy. It was so popular it got the attention of the federal government, which made it quit advertising the mineral water as a cure-all. There began the beginning of the end. Time, suddenly, was passing the Baker Hotel by.

By the 1960s, health resorts all over the country were losing business. Earl Baker, nephew of the founder, let it be known that he would get out of the business when he turned 70. In 1963, he did, and some Mineral Wells businessmen bought it shortly after - but the Baker's enchanted era was over. The hotel closed its doors for good in 1972. In those days, folks in Mineral Wells told tales of those who drank the water and lived long into their 100s. The story of a demented woman who drank the water and became sane made news across the nation. Some tried to bottle the water and sell it. Others tried to sell the land for outrageous prices. But only Baker had the genius to build a mammoth hotel

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