Pdf hawaii emergency management agency multi year training and

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Hurricanes Madeline and Lester, 2016/NOAA

Iao Valley, Maui, flooding, 2016

Disaster Assistance and Recovery Center, Pahoa, Hawaii, 2014

State of Hawaii

Hawaii Emergency Management Agency

Multi-year Training and Exercise Plan

2016-2018 (Revised January 2017)

Preface

The State of Hawaii is especially vulnerable to natural disasters due to its unique geographical setting. Hawaii has seen numerous destructive disasters: a category 4 hurricane, Hurricane Iniki, which struck on September 11, 1992; Tropical Storm Iselle in 2014; devastating lava flows on the Big Island between 1983 and 1993 that destroyed almost 200 homes, and again in 2015; severe flooding in March 2006 resulting in a dam break that killed seven people and storms that caused extensive flooding and damage on Maui in September 2016 resulting in a presidential disaster declaration; and a magnitude 6.7 earthquake in 2006 that caused severe damage on the Big Island, isolated a Maui community and resulted in an island-wide power outage on Oahu. The March 2011 Japan earthquake and tsunami caused major damage and destruction, especially to the Big Island. Tsunamis have accounted for more lost lives than the total of all other disasters in Hawaii. On April 1, 1946, 159 people lost their lives in Hawaii from a devastating tsunami that struck the Pacific, particularly in Hilo Town on the Big Island.

In the aftermath from these and other past disasters, the citizens of Hawaii have demonstrated remarkable resilience. This ever-present potential for a disaster, compounded by Hawaii's remote geographic location, underscores the need for a comprehensive, all-hazards approach for emergency preparedness and response.

The State of Hawaii has embraced a capabilities-based approach to training and exercising that addresses a broad range of risks and vulnerabilities. In pursuit of this approach, Hawaii has identified a need to coordinate planning, training, and exercising to strengthen overall proficiency in executing the 32 "core capabilities" defined in the 2015 National Preparedness Goal. Training and exercising play a crucial role in this process and provide Hawaii with a strategy for attaining, practicing, validating and improving new capabilities.

The Multi-Year Training and Exercise Planning Workshop (TEPW), conducted by Hawaii Emergency Management Agency on October 21, 2016, compiled stakeholder training and exercise plans and coordinated training and exercise schedules statewide. This input supplied the information to produce the 2016-2018 Hawaii Multi-Year Training and Exercise Plan (TEP). Hawaii's training and exercise programs are administered by Hawaii Emergency Management Agency, in coordination with the local emergency response agencies, Office of Homeland Security and FEMA Region IX, Pacific Area Office.

The Hawaii TEP is the roadmap for Hawaii to accomplish the priorities described within this document. Hawaii Emergency Management Agency is pursuing a Corrective Action Program (CAP) that combines enhanced planning, realistic exercises and innovative training to prevent, protect, mitigate, respond, and recover from emergencies and disasters that do occur. Training and exercise activities are the cornerstones to improving Hawaii's preparedness capabilities.

Points of Contact (POCs)

Jennifer Walter Preparedness Branch Chief Hawaii Emergency Management Agency 3949 Diamond Head Road Honolulu, HI 96816 808-733-4300, ext. 521 (office) jennifer.m.walter@

Bart Asato (State and EMI/FEMA trainings) Training Officer Hawaii Emergency Management Agency 3949 Diamond Head Road Honolulu, HI 96815 808-733-4300 x545 (office) bart.y.asato@

Dee Cook (Homeland Security-funded trainings) Administrator Office of Homeland Security 3949 Diamond Head Road Honolulu, HI 96816 dolores.m.cook@

Michael "Mick' Korman (Federal POC) Training and Exercise Specialist FEMA Region IX Pacific Area Office 808-851-7906 michael.korman@fema.

Table of Contents

Purpose ..................................................................................................................2 Program Priorities...................................................................................................3

Mass Care ............................................................................................................. 4-5 Planning and Operations ...................................................................................... 6-8 Logistics ................................................................................................................... 9 Cybersecurity ......................................................................................................... 10 Physical Protective Measures ................................................................................ 11 Risk Assessment ................................................................................................... 12 Methodology and Tracking ............................................................................ 13-15 Multi-Year Training and Exercise Schedule 2016-2019 ................................. 16-30 Acknowledgements ............................................................................................. 31

Dengue outbreak, Hawaii Island, 2015-2016 1

Purpose

The purpose of the Multi-year Training and Exercise Plan (TEP) is to document an organization's overall training and exercise program priorities for a specific multi-year time period. It is considered to be a living document that can be updated and refined annually. These priorities are linked to corresponding core capabilities, and, if applicable, a rationale based on existing strategic guidance, threat assessments, corrective actions from previous exercises, or other factors. This Multi-year TEP identifies the training and exercises that will help the organization build and sustain the core capabilities needed to address its training and exercise program priorities. The Multi-year TEP should lay out a combination of progressively building exercises ? along with the associated training requirements ? which address the priorities identified in the Training and Exercise Planning Workshop (TEPW). A progressive, multi-year exercise program enables organizations to participate in a series of increasingly complex exercises, with each successive exercise building upon the previous one until mastery is achieved. Further, by including training requirements in the planning process, organizations can address known shortfalls prior to exercising capabilities. Included in this Multi-year TEP is a training and exercise schedule, which provides a graphic illustration of the proposed activities scheduled for the years 2016 through 2019.

Emergency Operations Plans Workshop, 2016

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Program Priorities

The program priorities for the current training and exercise cycle were determined by the state and counties, and the supporting core capabilities are based on stakeholder input provided at the TEPW. The priorities focus on our threats and hazards from our State Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (THIRA) and areas identified for improvement in After Action Reports/Improvement Plans (AAR/IPs) from real events and exercises. A Corrective Action Program (CAP) is being implemented that will track and validate corrective actions in future exercises. Grant funding requirements and other reports, such as the State Preparedness Report (SPR), were also considered when determining the program priorities. The following were identified as the state's program priorities for the 2016 to 2018 training and exercise cycle:

1. Mass Care 2. Planning and Operations 3. Logistics 4. Cybersecurity (Homeland Security) 5. Physical Protective Measures (Homeland Security) 6. Risk Assessment (Homeland Security)

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