Virginia department of labor and industry

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Employer Logo (Insert Here)Employer Name (Insert Here)Infectious Disease (COVID-19) Preparedness and Response Plan TemplateI. PurposeThis plan describes the implementation of mandatory health and safety requirements established by the Virginia Department of Labor and Industry, Governor Northam’s COVID-19 Executive Order and subsequent Addendum as well as guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control. II. Responsibilities[Employer Name] has assigned the following individual(s) to serve in the role of health officer. The health officer has the authority to stop or alter activities to ensure that all work practices conform to the mandatory safety and health requirements applicable to COVID-19 as well as any other infectious disease hazards.[Name(s) and title(s) of health officer(s)]The following table is an example.Health Officer(s)NameTitleDepartmentPhone NumberFor the purpose of ensuring compliance with the most recent safety and health requirements, [Name and title] is responsible for administering this plan, monitoring agencies for new requirements, updating this plan, communicating any changes to employees, and monitoring the overall effectiveness of the plan. This person is also responsible for providing employees with a copy of this plan upon request.III. Determination of Exposure Risk by Job DutyWe have determined the COVID-19 exposure risk level of all worksite functions to ensure that we apply appropriate hazard controls – including training, equipment, and personal protective equipment (PPE) – to protect employees’ safety and health. This assessment is based on OSHA Publication 3990. Classes of employees have been assigned to risk categories as follows:Exposure Risk Level means an assessment of the possibility that an employee could be exposed to the hazards associated with SARS-CoV-2 virus and the COVID-19 disease. Hazards and job tasks have been divided into four risk exposure levels: “Very High”, “High”, “Medium”, and “Lower”.“Very High” exposure risk hazards or job tasks are those in places of employment with high potential for employee exposure to known or suspected sources of the SARSCoV-2 virus and the COVID-19 disease including, but not limited to, during specific medical, postmortem, or laboratory procedures (refer to page 8 of the 16 VAC 25-220, Emergency Temporary Standard/Emergency Regulation for a more detailed description). “High” exposure risk hazards or job tasks are those in places of employment with high potential for employee exposure within six feet with known or suspected sources of SARS-CoV-2 that are not otherwise classified as “very high” exposure risk (refer to page 8 of the 16 VAC 25-220, Emergency Temporary Standard/Emergency Regulation for a more detailed description). “Medium” exposure risk hazards or job tasks that are not labeled as “very high” or “high” (refer to pages 9-10 of the 16 VAC 25-220, Emergency Temporary Standard/Emergency Regulation for a more detailed description). “Lower” exposure risk hazards or job tasks are those not otherwise classified as “very high”, “high”, or “medium” exposure risk that do not require contact within six feet of persons known to be, or suspected of being, or who may be infected with SARS-CoV-2; nor contact within six feet with other employees, other persons, or the general public except as otherwise provided in this definition (refer to page 10 of the 16 VAC 25-220, Emergency Temporary Standard/Emergency Regulation for a more detailed description).The following graph relates to job tasks that pose a risk level to employees. The job tasks that are listed are not an all-inclusive list.41005132962276Employees Not Exposed Within 6 Feet Frequently or Close Contact with Persons Known, Unknown, or Suspected of COVID-19. Have Minimal or No Contact with Public, Coworkers, or Other Persons.00Employees Not Exposed Within 6 Feet Frequently or Close Contact with Persons Known, Unknown, or Suspected of COVID-19. Have Minimal or No Contact with Public, Coworkers, or Other Persons.37385632100263Employees Exposed Within 6 Feet of Other Employees, Customers, or Other Persons Known, Unknown, or Suspected of COVID-19. 00Employees Exposed Within 6 Feet of Other Employees, Customers, or Other Persons Known, Unknown, or Suspected of COVID-19. 31956381138238Healthcare Delivery & Support, First Responders, Medical Transport, Mortuary Employees, Employees Exposed Within 6 Feet of Known or Suspected COVID-19. This includes first responders.00Healthcare Delivery & Support, First Responders, Medical Transport, Mortuary Employees, Employees Exposed Within 6 Feet of Known or Suspected COVID-19. This includes first responders.2747963271463Healthcare Employees, Performing Aerosol-Generating Procedures, Healthcare/Lab Personnel, Morgue Employees, Known or Suspected COVID-19 Patients.00Healthcare Employees, Performing Aerosol-Generating Procedures, Healthcare/Lab Personnel, Morgue Employees, Known or Suspected COVID-19 Patients.Consult the definition of “Exposure risk level” of the Emergency Temporary Standard for COVID-19 by the Virginia Department of Labor and Industry. Also, consult pages 18 - 21 of the OSHA document “Guidance on Preparing Workplaces for COVID-19” which is available at and determine the risk level of each employee or class of employee based on their type of work and duties. Some jobs may have more than one type of exposure risk depending on the task or qualifying factors. When you have determined the risk level of all your employees and officials, list the work area, job/job tasks, employee exposure risk, and qualifying factors in the table.The following table is an example.Work AreaJob TasksExposure Risk DeterminationQualifying Factors(Example: No Public Contact, Public Contact)IV. Contingency Plan in the Event of an Infectious Disease OutbreakIn the event that an outbreak or pandemic due to an infectious disease, [Employer Name] has set up contingency plans for addressing the workplace needs as well as employee safety and health during the outbreak.These plans are as follows:[Insert Contingency Plans] These plans should address increased absenteeism, need for physical distancing, telework options, engineering, administrative, and PPE controls. in addition, the plans should address the need for essential operations and the use of reduced workforce through lower numbers of employees on site or the need to have employees cross-trained in the event of incident occurring.V. Basic Infectious Disease Prevention and Control MeasuresTo control the spread of infectious diseases such as COVID 19, basic prevention and control measures must be implemented to ensure that all employees are protected against the hazards of infectious disease.To control the spread of infectious disease it is important to keep up general housekeeping in the workplace. Additional housekeeping actions must also be implemented to ensure the safety and health of employees and decreasing the chances of spread of an infectious disease such as: All restrooms, common areas that remain in use, door knobs/handles, tools, equipment, and other frequently touched surfaces are disinfected before, in the middle of, and at the end of each shift. All contact surfaces of vehicles used by more than one person are disinfected at the end of each person’s use. All disinfectants are EPA-approved or otherwise comply with CDC disinfection guidance. [If reasonable, name(s) or title(s) of person(s) responsible for disinfecting each area]. The employer must make sure that adequate disinfection products are on hand, safety data sheets (SDSs) are obtained and retained, and employees using the products are aware of any personal protective equipment that is required for use. Additional precautions and actions to take are [Insert Employer name] specific actions being taken:Large gatherings are minimized whenever possible; staff meetings are postponed, cancelled or held remotely;Employees are encouraged to maintain physical distance even when on break, as well as before and after working hours; Employees are required to maintain physical distance when reporting to work, clocking in, leaving work, and clocking out;Employee work stations are greater than six feet apart;The employer may utilize flexible work hours, wherever possible, to limit the number of employees simultaneously working on-site; andEmployee interactions with the general public are modified to allow for additional physical space between parties.VI. Identification and Isolation of Sick and/or Exposed EmployeesRisk and exposure determinations are made without regard to employees protected characteristics as defined by local, state, and federal law. Any health-related information and documentation gathered from employees is maintained confidentially and in compliance with state and federal law. Specifically, medical documentation is stored separate from employee’s personnel documentation. Employee Self-MonitoringThe following employees should not report to work and, upon notification to [Employer name]; will be removed from the regular work schedule:Employees who display COVID-19 symptoms, such as fever, cough, shortness of breath, sore throat, new loss of smell or taste, and/or gastrointestinal problems, including nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting, whether or not accompanied by a formal COVID-19 diagnosis; Employees who, in the last 14 days, have had close contact with and/or live with any person having a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis; and Employees who, in the last 14 days, have had close contact with and/or live with any person displaying COVID-19 symptoms, such as fever, cough, shortness of breath, sore throat, new loss of smell or taste, and/or gastrointestinal problems, including nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting.Such employees may only resume in-person work upon meeting all return-to-work requirements, defined below. Daily ScreeningsTo prevent the spread of COVID-19 and reduce the potential risk of exposure, [Employer name] screens employees on a daily basis. Employees are asked the following questions before entering the worksite:Are you currently suffering from any of the following symptoms – fever, cough, shortness of breath, sore throat, new loss of smell or taste, and/or gastrointestinal problems, including nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting? If a touchless thermometer is available, temperature checks are performed. If yes, access is denied, and employee is advised to self-isolate/self-quarantine at home, until employee is permitted to return to work as defined below. Have you lived with, or had close contact with, someone in the last 14 days diagnosed with or displaying the symptoms of COVID-19?If yes, access is denied, and employee is advised to self-isolate/self-quarantine at home, until at least 14 days after the close contact. A reference chart of the above daily screening questions is listed below.Employees who develop symptoms during their shift must immediately report to their supervisor and/or Human Resources. Return-to-Work Requirements Employees who were themselves diagnosed with COVID-19 may only return to work upon confirmation of the cessation of symptoms and contagiousness, proof of which may be acquired via the test-based strategy or the non-test-based strategy.The test-based strategy is preferred but relies upon the availability of testing supplies and laboratory capacity. Under this strategy, employees may discontinue isolation and return to work upon achieving the following conditions:Resolution of fever without the use of fever-reducing medications; Improvement in respiratory symptoms (e.g., cough, shortness of breath); andNegative results of an FDA Emergency Use Authorized molecular assay for COVID-19 from two consecutive nasopharyngeal swab specimens collected at least 24 hours apart. Under the non-test-based strategy, employees may discontinue isolation and return to work upon achieving the following conditions: At least 3 days (72 hours) have passed since recovery defined as resolution of fever without the use of fever-reducing medications; Improvement in respiratory symptoms (e.g., cough, shortness of breath); and At least 7 days have passed since symptoms first appeared. Employees who come into close contact with or who may live with an individual with a confirmed diagnosis or symptoms may return to work after either 14 days have passed since the last close contact with the diagnosed and/or symptomatic individual. This includes the diagnosed and/or symptomatic individual receiving a negative COVID-19 test. Employees are typically required to submit a release to return to work from a healthcare provider; given the current stressors on the healthcare system, [Employer name] may accept written statements from employees confirming all the factors supporting their release.Actively encourage sick employees to stay home:Include a statement regarding your PTO program. The Families First Coronavirus Response Act Policies and Posters are to be posted in common places as well as on the employee shared IT drives?(if employees have questions regarding use of emergency paid sick time, employees should contact [Name of Contact].[Employer Name] will follow state and federal guidance for return to work guidance.Guidance from the employee’s health care provider will also be considered.VII. Procedures for Minimizing Exposure from Outside of Workplace [Employer Name] business practices are evaluated to ensure the safety and health of all individuals. This is done on a phased approach. Beginning with appointment only onsite meetings, virtual meetings, and finally transitioning to onsite meetings with appropriate precautions when that time comes.Social distancing practices to be observed: [Include all that apply]6-foot distances are marked in areas where customers might gather/waitIn person meetings are to be made by appointments onlyLimit the number of customers allowed into workplaceMinimize face to face contactInformation is posted throughout the worksite educating individuals on ways to reduce the spread of COVID-19.Any individual entering one of [Employer Name] facilities may have their?temperature checked and/or a questionnaire completed prior to entry. To minimize exposure from visitors or vendors: [Include all that apply]All business partners that work within [Employer Name] have been provided this Plan.When possible, [Employer Name] will limit the number of visitors in the facility.Possible statement about protection -?Any individual entering one of the?[Employer Name] facilities may have their temperature checked and/or a questionnaire completed prior to entry.Possible?statement?about protection: Masks may be available to visitors/vendors as well as appropriate disinfectants so individuals can clean work areas before and after use.Possible statement about protection -?All deliveries will be handled through curbside pick-up or delivery.Minimizing exposure from the general public:Social distancing practices to be observed: [Include all that apply]6-foot distances are marked in areas where individuals might gather/wait.Limit number of individuals allowed into workplace.Minimize face to face contact:Computer workstations positioned at least 6 feet apartInformation is posted at [Employer Name’s} facility educating individuals on ways to reduce the spread of COVID-19.?Any individual entering?[Employer Name]?may have their temperature checked and/or a questionnaire completed prior to entry.Individual symptoms may be assessed of COVID-19 and individuals with symptoms will be removed from the workplace.Possible statement about protection with General Public -?Physical barriers between [Employer Name] employees and the public will be considered in high impact areas (i.e. shielding at the front desk areas).Possible statement about protection with General Public – Masks may be available to the general public as well as appropriate disinfectants so individuals can clean work areas before and after use.VIII. TrainingAll employees at [Employer Name] will be required to have training on the hazards and characteristics of SARS-CoV-2 virus and COVID-19 disease. This training will ensure that all employees recognize the hazards of SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 as well as the procedures to minimize the hazards related to the infectious diseases and help prevent the spread of the infectious disease.The training material will cover the following:Requirements of the COVID-19 Emergency panies Infectious Disease Preparedness and Response Plan.Characteristics and methods of spread of SARS-CoV-2 virus.Symptoms of COVID-19 disease as well as the asymptomatic reactions of some persons to the SARS-CoV-2 virus.Safe and healthy work practices, including but not limited to, physical distancing, disinfection procedures, disinfecting frequency, and noncontact methods of greeting.PPEWhen PPE is requiredWhat PPE is requiredHow to properly don, doff, adjust and wear PPELimitations of PPEProper care, maintenance, useful life and disposal of PPEAll employees in the workplace will be trained on this subject and procedures. All training will be certified and recorded according to the Emergency Regulations for COVID-19 by the Virginia Department of Labor and Industry.Training Records will be certified by the following requirements (see example below):Employee nameEmployee’s signature (physical or electronic)DateSignature of TrainerThe following table is an example.Date:Trainer:Employee Name (Printed)Employee Name(Signature)Work AreaCOVID-19 Risk LevelRetention of training records must be retained in employee files. These records are located (Insert format and location used by employer). The most recent training records will be maintained. Industry Specific GuidelinesIndustry Specific Guidelines If your business is in one of the following industries, there may be other regulations to follow and include in your guide. Please see additional content here: Construction Manufacturing Research Laboratories RetailOfficeRestaurants & BarsOutdoor?Construction Industry GuidelinesBusinesses or operations in the construction industry must: Conduct a daily entry screening protocol for employees, contractors, suppliers, and any other individuals entering a worksite, including a questionnaire covering symptoms and suspected or confirmed exposure to people with possible COVID-19, together with, if possible, a temperature screening.Create dedicated entry point(s) at every worksite, if possible, for daily screening as provided in sub-provision (b) of this section, or in the alternative issue stickers or other indicators to employees to show that they received a screening before entering the worksite that day.Provide instructions for the distribution of personal protective equipment and designate on-site locations for soiled face coverings.Require the use of work gloves where appropriate to prevent skin contact with contaminated surfaces.Identify choke points and high-risk areas where employees must stand near one another (such as hallways, hoists and elevators, break areas, water stations, and buses) and control their access and use (including through physical barriers) so that social distancing is maintained. Ensure there are sufficient hand-washing or hand-sanitizing stations at the worksite to enable easy access by employees.Notify contractors (if a subcontractor) or owners (if a contractor) of any confirmed COVID-19 cases among employees at the worksite.Restrict unnecessary movement between project sites.Create protocols for minimizing personal contact upon delivery of materials to the worksite. Manufacturing Facilities GuidelinesBusinesses or operations in the manufacturing industry must: Conduct a daily entry screening protocol for employees, contractors, suppliers, and any other individuals entering the facility, including a questionnaire covering symptoms and suspected or confirmed exposure to people with possible COVID-19, together with temperature screening as soon as no-touch thermometers can be obtained.Create dedicated entry point(s) at every facility for daily screening as provided in sub-provision (a) of this section, and ensure physical barriers are in place to prevent anyone from bypassing the screening.Suspend all non-essential in-person visits, including tours.Train employees on, at a minimum:Routes by which the virus causing COVID-19 is transmitted from person to person.Distance that the virus can travel in the air, as well as the time it remains viable in the air and on environmental surfaces.The use of personal protective equipment, including the proper steps for putting it on and taking it off.Reduce congestion in common spaces wherever practicable by, for example, closing salad bars and buffets within cafeterias and kitchens, requiring individuals to sit at least six feet from one another, placing markings on the floor to allow social distancing while standing in line, offering boxed food via delivery or pick-up points, and reducing cash payments.Implement rotational shift schedules where possible (e.g., increasing the number of shifts, alternating days or weeks) to reduce the number of employees in the facility at the same time.Stagger meal and break times, as well as start times at each entrance, where possible.Install temporary physical barriers, where practicable, between workstations and cafeteria tables.Create protocols for minimizing personal contact upon delivery of materials to the facility.Adopt protocols to limit the sharing of tools and equipment to the maximum extent possible.Ensure there are sufficient hand-washing or hand-sanitizing stations at the worksite to enable easy access by employees, and discontinue use of hand dryers.Notify plant leaders and potentially exposed individuals upon identification of a positive case of COVID-19 in the facility, as well as maintain a central log for symptomatic employees or employees who received a positive test for COVID-19.Send potentially exposed individual’s home upon identification of a positive case of COVID-19 in the facility:Require employees to self-report to plant leaders as soon as possible after developing symptoms of COVID-19.Shut areas of the manufacturing facility for cleaning and disinfection, as necessary, if an employee goes home because he or she is displaying symptoms of COVID-19. Research Laboratory RegulationsResearch laboratories but not laboratories that perform diagnostic testing must:Assign dedicated entry point(s) and/or times into lab buildings. Conduct a daily entry screening protocol for employees, contractors, suppliers, and any other individuals entering a worksite, including a questionnaire covering symptoms and suspected or confirmed exposure to people with possible COVID-19, together with, if possible, a temperature screening.Create protocols and/or checklists as necessary to conform to the facility’s COVID-19 preparedness and response plan under section 1(a).Suspend all non-essential in-person visitors (including visiting scholars and undergraduate students) until further notice.Establish and implement a plan for distributing face coverings.Limit the number of people per square feet of floor space permitted in a particular laboratory at one time.Close open workspaces, cafeterias, and conference rooms.As necessary, use tape on the floor to demarcate socially distanced workspaces and to create one-way traffic flow.Require all office and dry lab work to be conducted remotely.Minimize the use of shared lab equipment and shared lab tools and create protocols for disinfecting lab equipment and lab tools.Provide disinfecting supplies and require employees to wipe down their work stations at least twice daily.Implement an audit and compliance procedure to ensure that cleaning criteria are followed.Establish a clear reporting process for any symptomatic individual or any individual with a confirmed case of COVID-19, including the notification of lab leaders and the maintenance of a central log:Clean and disinfect the work site when an employee is sent home with symptoms or with a confirmed case of COVID-19.Send any potentially exposed co-workers home if there is a positive case in the facility. Restrict all non-essential travel, including in-person conference events. Retail Store RegulationsRetail stores that are open for in-store sales must: Create communications material for customers (e.g., signs or pamphlets) to inform them of changes to store practices and to explain the precautions the store is taking to prevent infection. Establish lines to regulate entry in accordance with subsection (c) of this section, with markings for patrons to enable them to stand at least six feet apart from one another while waiting. Stores should also explore alternatives to lines such as allowing customers to wait in their cars for a text message or phone call, enabling social distancing and accommodating seniors or those with disabilities. Adhere to the following restrictions:Create at least two hours per week of dedicated shopping time for vulnerable populations, which for purposes of this order are people over 60, pregnant women, and those with chronic conditions like heart disease, diabetes, and lung disease.The director of the Department of Health and Human Services is authorized to issue an emergency order varying the capacity limits described in this subsection as necessary to protect the public health. Post signs at store entrance(s) instructing customers of their legal obligation to wear a face covering when inside the store. Post signs at store entrance(s) informing customers not to enter if they are or have recently been sick.Design spaces and store activities in a manner that encourages employees and customers to maintain six feet of distance from one another.Install physical barriers at checkout or other service points that require interaction including Plexiglas barriers, tape markers, or tables as appropriate.Establish an enhanced cleaning and sanitizing protocol for high-touch areas like restrooms, credit-card machines, keypads, counters, shopping carts, and other surfaces.Train employees on:Appropriate cleaning procedures including training for cashiers on cleaning between customer transactions.How to manage symptomatic customers upon entry or in the store. Notify employees if the employer learns that an individual (including a customer or supplier) with a confirmed case of COVID-19 has visited the store. Limit staffing to the minimum number necessary to operate.?Office RegulationsAssign dedicated entry point(s) for all employees to reduce congestion at the main entrance. Provide visual indicators of appropriate spacing for employees outside the building in case of congestion. Take steps to reduce entry congestion and to ensure the effectiveness of screening (e.g., by staggering start times, adopting a rotational schedule where only half of employees are in the office at a particular time). Require face coverings in shared spaces, including during in-person meetings and in restrooms and hallways. Increase distancing between employees by spreading out workspaces, staggering workspace usage, restricting non-essential common space (e.g., cafeterias), providing visual cues to guide movement and activity (e.g., restricting elevator capacity with markings, locking conference rooms). Prohibit social gatherings and meetings that do not allow for social distancing or that create unnecessary movement through the office. Provide disinfecting supplies and require employees wipe down their workstations at least twice daily. Post signs about the importance of personal hygiene.Disinfect high-touch surfaces in offices (e.g., whiteboard markers, restrooms, handles) and minimize shared items when possible (e.g., pens, remotes, and whiteboards).Institute cleaning and communications protocols when employees are sent home with symptoms.Notify employees if the employer learns that an individual (including a customer, supplier, or visitor) with a confirmed case of COVID-19 has visited the office.Suspend all nonessential visitors.Restrict all non-essential travel, including in-person conference events. Restaurant & Bar Regulations Limit capacity to 50% of normal seating.Require six feet of separation between parties or groups at different tables or bar tops (e.g., spread tables out, use every other table, remove or put up chairs or barstools that are not in use). Create communications material for customers (e.g., signs, pamphlets) to inform them of changes to restaurant or bar practices and to explain the precautions that are being taken to prevent infection. Close waiting areas and ask customers to wait in cars for a call when their table is ready.Close self-serve food or drink options, such as buffets, salad bars, and drink stations. Provide physical guides, such as tape on floors or sidewalks and signage on walls to ensure that customers remain at least six feet apart in any lines. Post sign(s) at store entrance(s) informing customers not to enter if they are or have recently been sick.Post sign(s) instructing customers to wear face coverings until they get to their table. Require hosts and servers to wear face coverings in the dining area.Require employees to wear face coverings and gloves in the kitchen area when handling food, consistent with guidelines from the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”). Limit shared items for customers (e.g., condiments, menus) and clean high-contact areas after each customer (e.g., tables, chairs, menus, payment tools, condiments). Train employees on:Appropriate use of personal protective equipment in conjunction with food safety guidelines.Food safety health protocols (e.g., cleaning between customers, especially shared condiments).How to manage symptomatic customers upon entry or in the restaurant. Notify employees if the employer learns that an individual (including an employee, customer, or supplier) with a confirmed case of COVID-19 has visited the store.Close restaurant immediately if an employee shows multiple symptoms of COVID-19 (fever, atypical shortness of breath, atypical cough) and perform a deep clean, consistent with guidance from FDA and the Center for Disease Control. Such cleaning may occur overnight.Require a doctor’s written release to return to work if an employee has a confirmed case of COVID-19.Install physical barriers, such as sneeze guards and partitions at cash registers, bars, host stands, and other areas where maintaining physical distance of six feet is difficult.To the maximum extent possible, limit the number of employees in shared spaces, including kitchens, break rooms, and offices, to maintain at least a six-foot distance between employees.Outdoor:Businesses or operations whose work is primarily and traditionally performed outdoors mustProhibit gatherings of any size in which people cannot maintain six feet of distance from one another.Limit in-person interaction with clients and patrons to the maximum extent possible, and bar any such interaction in which people cannot maintain six feet of distance from one another.Provide and require the use of personal protective equipment such as gloves, goggles, face shields, and face coverings, as appropriate for the activity being performed.Adopt protocols to limit the sharing of tools and equipment to the maximum extent possible and to ensure frequent and thorough cleaning and disinfection of tools, equipment, and frequently touched surfaces.

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